Last week, I wrote about a few of the things that I would call “keys to success” for work-from-homers. While I stand by those suggestions and credit them with the fact that I’m now almost six months into this journey and haven’t lost my mind (yet), my method is far from perfect, so I think it’s time for another round of Real Talk (you can check out the first one here!). You guys keep me honest, and as always, I want to be as transparent as possible about these transitions and experiences.

Matt and I spent this past weekend at the Jersey shore, and it couldn’t have come at a better time. I was feeling pretty burned out toward the end of last week, and even though I still had to work while we were away, the change of scenery couldn’t have come at a better time. Sometimes, all it takes to get back on track mentally is a day or two outside of your normal routine — and a walk on a cloudy beach or a few hours with a good book definitely doesn’t hurt, either.

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I’m so lucky to have this guy to help bring me back when I’m feeling down. 

I wish I could put my finger on exactly why I felt so stretched to my breaking point last week. After a weekend of traveling, I was trying to settle back into both my work and personal routines, and I just felt like I couldn’t keep up with what needed to get done. Then, as soon as I felt caught up, I realized that what I really wanted to be was ahead, and the frustration of not being ahead launched me into a whole other round of being annoyed with myself. And then, I would internally scold myself for not being more patient and not celebrating the strides that I was making. All of this ultimately led to me getting angry that I was scolding myself and not granting myself more grace… and you can totally see how this line of thought could drive a girl (especially a sleep-deprived one) crazy.

One thing you can really miss when you’re working from home is the voice of reason that often comes to you in the form of incredible office friends and co-workers. I hit plenty of low points back in my old job, too, but there was always someone in the next cubicle ready to talk me down and put a pin in the irrational cycle of thinking described above.

Most of the time, I enjoy being alone in my home office. I’ve always been inherently independent, and I find that I’m much more productive when I can be self-directed about my work. When things are status quo, this is all true, but when I’m talking myself into a pretty depressing corner (like I was last week), I really start to miss the tough love and listening ear of colleagues. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again — working from home is not all easy, and it’s not all glamorous. The highs feel super high, but the lows are no fun. And that’s your Real Talk for the day : )

Luckily, as I start to rack up more projects, I’m able to surround myself with new contacts who are definitely feeling more like friends every day. I’m trying to learn to open up to these new people, and I’m also working harder at asking for help from my loved ones when I know I need their support to snap out of a freelance/work-from-home funk. Like I did this weekend, I need to allow myself to take a break from the daily routine so I can reset my attitude. A little self-care really does work wonders!

What do you do when you’re stuck in a cycle of negative self-talk? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below!

***Don’t forget to enter the February giveaway so you can win this beautiful blue necklace from The Shine Project!  All you have to do to enter to win is comment on my last post here. I’ll be drawing and announcing the winner on Thursday! ***

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